Ozark Outdoors

2015 Storm Spotter Training Class free to Public

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The tell-tale anvil shape of a mature cumulonimbus cloud looms down a highway in central Oklahoma. This supercell storm produced a tornado one hour after this image was taken.

The tell-tale anvil shape of a mature cumulonimbus cloud looms down a highway in central Oklahoma. This supercell storm produced a tornado one hour after this image was taken.

The Springfield-Greene County Office of Emergency Management (OEM), in partnership with the National Weather Service, is offering a Storm Spotter Training Course to all interested members of the public. This course will begin at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 24, at the Assemblies of God National Leadership & Resource Center Auditorium, 1445 N. Boonville Ave., in Springfield. Admittance is free and no registration is required.

Mark Burchfield

Mark Burchfield

“Trained Storm Spotters are a valuable asset to the public, the National Weather Service and the Office of Emergency Management. They provide detailed reports on weather events that result in coordination of response and important warnings that ultimately protect citizens and property,” says Mark Burchfield, OEM Training and Exercise Specialist and Greene County CERT Coordinator. “I highly recommend this class to all those interested in active storm spotting.”

The course will include an overview of the National Weather Service and its functions, the National Weather Service weather warning process and the mission and role of a storm spotter in the warning process.

Attendees will be instructed on how to effectively provide Emergency Management and the National Weather Service with real-time weather information from fixed or mobile locations. This information aids Emergency Management and the National Weather Service in its assessment of weather events.

For questions about this course, contact OEM at 417-869-6040.

George Freeman is a veteran journalist and photographer. An award-winning writer, editor and columnist in Springfield, Mo., with more than 50 years experience. His preference is for positive and uplifting stories about people, places, traditions and trends that make the Ozarks one of the most livable regions anywhere. A member of the Garden Writers Association of America, he is a past-president of the Society of Professional Journalists of Southwest Missouri, the Kansas and Ohio AP societies; a board member of Friends of the Garden and a member of the Rotary Club of Springfield. In 1976, he traveled to India as a member of a Rotary Foundation Group Study Exchange Team.

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