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Botanical Gardens entrance will close four days for crossing upgrade

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The Leaky Roof Railroad hauled stone from Phenix Quarry, just one part of a network of railroad lines that made Springfield a major hub for railroad lines for many years.

The Leaky Roof Railroad hauled stone from Phenix Quarry, just one part of a network of railroad lines that made Springfield a major hub for railroad lines for many years.

This is one of those good news, bad news announcements that you may want to share with friends who frequently enjoy the Springfield Botanical Gardens for exercise and activities.

The main entrance to the Springfield Botanical Gardens at Nathanael Greene/Close Memorial Park will be closed to vehicular traffic while the railway crossing at the main entrance is replaced. The project will continue from August 23 – 26, 2016, just in time for a busy schedule of fall events, including the Japanese Fall Festival and Gray-Campbell Farmstead Pioneer Expo in September.

The Botanical Center will remain open and the gardens and grounds are accessible via the South Creek Greenway trail. Please be considerate of businesses nearby as you search for a parking place.

Trailhead Parking is available at McDaniel Park at 2405 S. National Avenue (National Avenue and Sunset Street) or at Tal’s Trailhead at 3351 S. Kauffman Road. The Volunteer Nature Trail section at 4680 W. Rountree Road is another option and limited parking may be available at the American Legion Post 639, south of the park on Scenic Ave.

The section of track is part of an industrial trackage, disconnected from the rest of the Missouri North Arkansa (MNA)s system and traffic is hauled via BNSF to and from the Aurora interchange. MNA traffic generally consists of coal, grain, frozen food, minerals, steel, chemicals, and asphalt.

 

George Freeman is a veteran journalist and photographer. An award-winning writer, editor and columnist in Springfield, Mo., with more than 50 years experience. His preference is for positive and uplifting stories about people, places, traditions and trends that make the Ozarks one of the most livable regions anywhere. A member of the Garden Writers Association of America, he is a past-president of the Society of Professional Journalists of Southwest Missouri, the Kansas and Ohio AP societies; a board member of Friends of the Garden and a member of the Rotary Club of Springfield. In 1976, he traveled to India as a member of a Rotary Foundation Group Study Exchange Team.

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