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Master Gardeners of the Ozarks focus on pollinators

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A bee on wildfire does what bees do. By landing and feeding on nectar, the bee also picks up pollen to be passed along on its next stop, and that's how it happens. Birds and bees, flowers and tree, it's a thing called...well pollination actually.

A bee on wildfire does what bees do. By landing and feeding on nectar, the bee also picks up pollen to be passed along on its next stop, and that’s how it happens. Birds and bees, flowers and tree, it’s a thing called…well pollination actually.

FORSYTH, Mo. — Several butterfly and bumblebee species have disappeared in the southwest Missouri area. The Master Gardeners of the Ozarks invites gardeners of every level of expertise to learn what can be done to support pollinators by creating pollinator friendly gardens and habitats.

The class will begin at 10 a.m., Saturday, Aug. 22, in the demonstration garden behind the Taney County MU Extension Center, 122 Felkins Avenue in Forsyth.

“You will learn about what plants grow best in our area and what will attract bees, butterflies, humming birds and other insects that are native to this area,” says Danny Manis, president, Master Gardeners of the Ozarks. ‘You will also be able to see a lot of the actual plants in bloom in our demonstration gardens,”

These programs are held at the Taney County MU Extension Center in Forsyth in the Master Gardeners Demonstration Garden. Programs are free and open to the public as part of their community education outreach.

Future classes in 2015 include one at Noon Tuesday, Sept. 1, “Growing Micro Greens” and the last class at 10 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 10, “Monarch Watch.”

The Taney County MU Extension Center is just down for the Taney County Judicial Center. For information, call the Taney County Extension Center, 417-546-4431.

George Freeman is a veteran journalist and photographer. An award-winning writer, editor and columnist in Springfield, Mo., with more than 50 years experience. His preference is for positive and uplifting stories about people, places, traditions and trends that make the Ozarks one of the most livable regions anywhere. A member of the Garden Writers Association of America, he is a past-president of the Society of Professional Journalists of Southwest Missouri, the Kansas and Ohio AP societies; a board member of Friends of the Garden and a member of the Rotary Club of Springfield. In 1976, he traveled to India as a member of a Rotary Foundation Group Study Exchange Team.

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