KubotaoftheOzarks

New street sweeper displays powerful message to Springfield

Posted By  | On 0 Comments
The City of Springfield is out to make a powerful statement by way of its new street-sweeping truck, which may be the most colorful transgraphic vehicle in the Ozarks. Not to forget City Utilities' entire bus fleet also sports a marketing message.

The City of Springfield is out to make a powerful statement by way of its new street-sweeping truck, which may be the most colorful transgraphic vehicle in the Ozarks. Not to forget City Utilities’ entire bus fleet also sports a marketing message.

The City of Springfield’s newest street sweeper seems likely to make an impression wherever it goes.

Not only will it clean streets, it’s also a high-impact mobile billboard reminding citizens of their role in keeping Ozarks waterways clean.

“The ‘Working together to protect our streams one mile at a time,’ message and graphics, were chosen to highlight the relationship between clean streets and water quality in our streams, rivers, and lakes,” says Water Quality Coordinator Carrie Lamb.

“Streets and storm drains flow directly into our waterways, unlike indoor sewer drains which carry sewage to the wastewater treatment plant.”
The sweeper, a $290,000 Elgin Whirlwind, is the sixth in the City’s fleet of sweepers. The new model offers an additional safety feature and is environmentally friendly, according to Public Grounds Maintenance Supervisor Bryan Loughrige.
“This is our first sweeper with a back-up camera that has audio, and it is also equipped with a Tier 3 engine,” Loughrige says. “The Tier 3 program is part of a comprehensive approach to reducing the impacts of motor vehicles on air quality and public health. The program considers the vehicle and its fuel as an integrated system, setting new vehicle emissions standards and lowering the sulfur content of gasoline, beginning in 2017.”

In addition to keeping roadways clean and safe, street sweeping removes dirt and debris that would otherwise end up in waterways, impacting water quality.

“Citizens play an important role in keeping waterways clean by keeping pollution out of streets and storm drains, and by reporting pollution,” Lamb said. “A common pollution problem in our area is citizens blowing or sweeping leaves, grass clippings or other yard waste into the street or the storm drains. Yard waste gets washed downstream, degrading the quality of waterways by adding excess nutrients that turn the water green and lead to algae blooms.”
Citizens are encouraged to report pollution by calling the Citizen Resource Center at 864-1010, Lamb said.

George Freeman is a veteran journalist and photographer. An award-winning writer, editor and columnist in Springfield, Mo., with more than 50 years experience. His preference is for positive and uplifting stories about people, places, traditions and trends that make the Ozarks one of the most livable regions anywhere. A member of the Garden Writers Association of America, he is a past-president of the Society of Professional Journalists of Southwest Missouri, the Kansas and Ohio AP societies; a board member of Friends of the Garden and a member of the Rotary Club of Springfield. In 1976, he traveled to India as a member of a Rotary Foundation Group Study Exchange Team.

You must be logged in to post a comment Login